Not So Dismal

Making Economics a Little Easier to Understand

Of Pianos and Cars

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A great column has been published today over at Mises worth reading. As a musician myself, the subject certainly struck a chord (ha). The author looks at the rise and fall of piano production in the United States and how it compares to Detroit’s situation today. Certainly an interesting and valid analogy, proving that no particular product or good is exempt from the laws of the free market. I stand by my previous statements that providing a bridge loan to GM and Ford is a more palatable situation than printing money to cover losses on absurd, synthetic financial instruments, but Mr. Tucker does us the good deed of reminding us that less-bad is not the correct option in the long run. Excerpt and link to the full article follow below:

With the growth of this manufacturing came an explosion of shops that served the piano market all up and down the industry. Piano tuning was a big-time profession. Retail shops with pianos opened everywhere, and the sheet-music business exploded with them. Ever notice how in big cities the music stores are typically family owned and established 40, 50, and even 100 years ago? This is a surviving remnant of our industrial past.

All of this changed again in 1930, which was the last great year of the American piano. Sales fell and continued to fall when times were tough. The companies that were beloved by all Americans fell on hard times and began to go belly up one by one. After World War II the trend continued, as ever more pianos began to be made overseas.

In 1960, we began to see the first major international challenge to what was left of the US market position. Japan was already manufacturing half as many pianos as the United States. By 1970, a revolution occurred as Japan’s production outstripped the United States, and it has been straight down ever sense. By 1980, Japan made twice as many as the United States. Then production shifted to Korea. Today China is the center of world piano production. You probably see them in your local hotel bar.

Click to Continue Reading “The End of the US Piano Industry”

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Written by caseyayers

10 December, 2008 at 12:06 pm

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